BORIS KOSAREV PROJECT IN “THE WHITE SPACE”

On 25 July, 2011 the White Space of the Stedley Art Foundation hosted the presentation of an exhibition project “From Lotus to Sickle: Kharkiv in the Works of Boris Kosarev”.

The Kharkiv-born Boris Kosarev is a key figure, along with Basyl’ Yermilov, in the “Kharkiv Era” of the Ukrainian avant-guarde of the early twentieth century. Remarkably, for a long time they shared a studio in Kharkiv where each worked on his works, and together they faced the challenges of the twentieth century.

Boris Kosarev’s creative work is closely associated with the artistic avant-garde context of the turn of the century, as well as with the famous creators of avant-garde - Velemyr Khlebnikov, David Burliuk, Nikolai Aseyev, the Sinyakov sisters, Alexander Khvostenko-Khvostov, Anatole Petrytsky, Oleksandr Dovzhenko and others.

Boris Kosarev is known in Ukraine, first and foremost, as an avant-garde theater artist. He made sketches for the following plays of the 1920s:  “Pan” (after Charles Van Lerberghe’s play), “The Cricket on the Hearth” (after Charles Dickens), “Hubeane” (after R. Pobedymsky’s play) and many others. At the same time, his drawing legacy - books, posters, billboards, etc., as well as his paintings and work in the “Seven” group, are of equal interest.

The artist’s contribution to the documentary and artistic photography is enormous. It is not known for certain when Kosarev made his first shots, but those that have survived to the present day feature World War I. Even his researchers were surprised to find that Kosarev was assistant to camera operator Demutsky during the shootings of Alexander Dovzhenko’s world-famous film “Earth”. His production stills of “Earth "and “Sorochynsky Fair” are of great artistic and historical value.

Most of Kosarev’s works are in the private collection of his daughter Nadiya Borysivna Kosareva. These private collection works make the basis for the first exhibition to be opened in the Ukrainian Museum in New York in December 2011. The exhibition will last for three months. Other possible exhibitions have been being negotiated.

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